• July 2014

Celebrating Grateful Americans

What can the nation’s founders teach today’s business leaders? A lot, insists David Bruce Smith, founder of The Grateful American™ Series—a foundation dedicated to restoring enthusiasm in American history, for kids and adults.

Inspired by his father, business leader and philanthropist Robert H. Smith, The Grateful American™ Series is an interactive, multimedia project that includes a TV Show on DCTV, FairfaxTV, and other cable networks; and a radio show that features interviews of the leaders of the nation’s presidential homes and historic sites. Coming, too, will be a guidebook for kids and parents to help families learn more about American history so they can experience the riches of the past for the themselves. Sculpture of James and Dolley Madison, above, by Ivan Schwartz, July’s Fine Artist of the Month.

July 4 marked the launch of The Grateful American Series website—a portal to the stories, interviews, videos, and events that bring history to life: GratefulAmericanFoundation.com.

To kick off this educational series, we headed to Montpelier, the family home of James and Dolley Madison. Our guide was Kat Imhoff, who has been president of James and Dolley Madison’s Montpelier Foundation since January 2013. Scroll down for our Q&A with this historian, who gives us the inside scoop on this fascinating first couple.

How are you a Grateful American? In celebration of everything great that America stands for, we’re asking our readers to share their thoughts on what they are grateful about. Our goal is to list 1776 comments. We invite you to join us! Click here to send us your thoughts to include on the website. And don’t forget to include a photo.

Also in this issue:

  • Historian and professor Adam Goodheart takes us inside the pivotal year of “1861” in our July Book of the Month.
  • Meet the team that runs the “Center for the Constitution” at Montpelier on Inkandescent Radio, and dive deeper into what the Founding Fathers were thinking as they crafted the nation.

In the spirit of restoring enthusiasm in American history, we leave you with this parting thought from President James Madison: “A people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.”

Here’s to your incredible, indelible, Inkandescent success! — Hope Katz Gibbs, Publisher Be Inkandescent • Executive Director, Grateful American Foundation

Montpelier's Kat Imhoff Takes Us Inside the Home and Lives of James and Dolley Madison

COVER STORY: JULY 2014

Montpelier Foundation President Kat Imhoff Takes Us Inside the Estate and Private Lives of James and Dolley Madison

By Hope Katz Gibbs
Publisher Be Inkandescent

If you haven’t had the opportunity to visit the Virginia home of James and Dolley Madison, be sure to put it on your to-do list.

After Madison’s presidency, Montpelier became the family plantation that the couple retired to in 1817. They entertained hundreds of visitors and jointly edited Madison’s significant political papers—including his notes on the Constitutional Convention.

“Madison predeceased Dolley by 13 years, after which she traveled back and forth between Montpelier and Washington, DC, before permanently settling in the nation’s capital in 1844,” explains Kat Imhoff, who has been president of The Montpelier Foundation since January 2013.

Interviewing Imhoff for the July episode of The Grateful American™ TV Show. was a pleasure. In addition to being an expert on the Madisons, she formerly was chief operating officer and vice president of the Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello, heading special initiatives and leading the team that created the new Visitors Center.

Imhoff also served as the state director for The Nature Conservancy in Montana, where she led the organization’s Montana Legacy Project—the purchase of more than 300,000 acres of land in the Northern Rockies bordering Glacier National Park. This land now completes a corridor of environmental protection extending across Montana from Wyoming.

Before we dive into our Q&A with Kat Imhoff, here’s a brief primer on James Madison.

Often considered the most cerebral of the Founding Fathers, Madison had one of the most effective and influential careers in the history of American politics.

“Even as a young child, Madison was bright, erudite, analytical, and thirsty for knowledge,” Imhoff explains. “Madison was literate in seven languages, curious about the latest technological advances, and obtained his degree from the College of New Jersey, which today is Princeton.”

He was considered tenacious, perhaps a bit scrappy, and a defender of rights for all Americans. He was a skillful legislator, serving in the Virginia Assembly, the Continental Congress, and the first four Congresses of the United States. He also served as secretary of state for Thomas Jefferson, and then as two-term president of the United States, from 1809-1817.

Imhoff says Madison is best known for his role as Father of the Constitution, in recognition of his leadership, scholarship, and dedication in shaping the values that characterize our nation and resulted in the first and longest-standing representative government on earth.

As for his love life: On Sept. 15, 1794, the 43-year-old, never-married Congressman James Madison married 26-year-old widow Dolley Payne Todd. Throughout their 42-year-long marriage, Dolley was an indispensable aid to her husband’s career and is responsible for many notable accomplishments in her own right.

“Dolley was known to be fond of feminine frippery, and for using her social savvy as a means of political diplomacy,” Imhoff notes. “She implemented unprecedented standards in the nation’s new capital in Washington, DC, creating traditions that are still followed to this day.”

Are you ready to learn from the past? Click here to read our entire Q&A with Imhoff. And click here to learn five things you can discuss about James and Dolley Madison at dinner tonight.

Also be sure to listen to watch this Grateful American TV episode on InkandescentTV. And listen to our podcast interview on Inkandescent Radio.

For more insights, click here for 10 Leadership Lessons from JMU President Jon Alger.

Futurist Chris Carbone Provides Insight Into Jobs: 2020 and Beyond

By Futurist Chris Carbone
Co-author of the upcoming book series and website: So You Want To Be A…

Where will you work in 2020? That’s the million-dollar question. In fact, the future of work is one of the hottest trends I am studying. Like the economy, it is one of the big mysteries that keeps us all up at night.

As a futurist, my job is to track international business and consumer trends by reading and analyzing just about anything I can get my hands on. The goal is to determine what the world might look like five, 10, and 20 years down the pike, and by tracking what’s going on today, my colleagues and I are able to forecast what life might look like around the bend.

In fact, my research shows that work will look much different in 2020, whether judged by the types of computing devices we use on the job, where we work, or the way we collaborate with our coworkers. Following are some of the trends that I am seeing.

For starters, the types of jobs that people hold will change.

Indeed, there will be careers that don’t even exist today—just as there were no “social media strategists” or “mobile app developers” just a few short years ago.

That said, a great many of the jobs that will be held in 2020 are here today—and there’s a simple way to learn what they are by tapping into the wonderful work of government statistics.

Now, this may not sound like the most thrilling thing to do on a Friday night, and to save you the trouble, we’ve combed through the most recent employment projections for 2010-2020 developed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

The BLS creates these long-term projections to help educators, counselors, and policymakers plan for the needs of the future workforce. These projections can also offer insight to parents, students, career-changers, and anyone who—like me—knows that there’s a pretty solid chance that come 2020, they’re 1) not going to be independently wealthy, and 2) are still going to want and need to be working.

So what can we say about the careers of 2020 by looking at the most recent BLS data?

1. Let’s start with the good news: There will be millions of jobs to be had.

The BLS projects that there will be nearly 55 million job openings during the decade from 2010-2020. About 34 million of these jobs will come from the need to replace workers who retire or leave their job for another job or to return to school, etc., and nearly 21 million will come from new jobs that will be created during the decade.

(These projections assume a “full employment” economy in 2020 with unemployment of 5.2 percent, a welcome change from the current 6.1 percent in June, and a big improvement over the 10.0 percent rate in October 2009, according to the BLS.)

2. To find the jobs, follow our changing society, and the economy.

The jobs that will be plentiful in 2020 reflect some of the basic changes under way in US society and the economy, such as the aging of the population (especially the huge wave of Baby Boomers), a continued shift toward services and knowledge work, the increasingly important role that science and technology plays in our lives, and the continued recovery of construction and other sectors that were hit hard by the Great Recession.

Research from the business community suggests a similar future. Researchers at McKinsey & Co., for example, forecast that six sectors will account for up to 85 percent of the new jobs created through 2020. They are health care, business services, leisure and hospitality, construction, retail, and certain types of manufacturing jobs.

3. Business jobs will remain attractive.

There will be some 5.1 million job openings in management, business, and finance through 2020 due to growth and replacement needs. Think of jobs such as company executives and managers, operations and HR managers, financial analysts, accountants and auditors, and advertising positions.

As a whole, this class of jobs will grow more slowly (11.5%) than total employment (14.3%) between 2010-2020, but with the median annual salaries for many of these jobs ranging into the $70,000s, $80,000s, and well beyond into six figures, this will continue to be an attractive category of jobs.

Some jobs will grow much faster than the management, business, and finance category’s 11.5 percent. This includes market research analysts and marketing specialists (42%), personal financial advisors (32%), social service managers (27%), and managers of health services (22%).

One real surprise in the data is that the number of meeting, convention, and event planners was projected to rise by nearly 44 percent by 2020, resulting in 31,000 new jobs and 45,000 total job openings.

While not huge numbers, the growth rate makes it the fastest growing job in management, business, and finance in the coming years. Clearly, face-to-face still matters, even as social networking and our “digital lives” become more important.

4. Find your future with STEM jobs (science, technology, engineering, and math).

Science and technology will continue to have dramatic impacts on our economy and society in the coming decade—and as we increasingly rely more on complex systems and digital, genetic, and technologies of all types, the prospect for computer, engineering, and science jobs will be strong.

This class of jobs will grow by 17 percent through 2020, faster than the job market overall (14.3%). There will be 2.8 million job openings in this category due to growth and replacement needs through 2020. This will include many high-paying positions such as software developers and programmers ($85K median wage), statisticians ($73K median wage), chemical engineers ($90K median), psychologists ($68K median wage), and urban planners ($63K median wage).

Which occupation in this category will offer the most jobs? Given the importance of information technology in our work and personal lives, it should come as no surprise that it’s software developers and programmers.

There will be some 494,000 job openings for software developers and programmers through 2020 (about 314,000 new jobs and 180,000 jobs from replacement needs). For perspective, how does this compare to one of the classic, go-to professional jobs of the past couple decades … attorneys?

In raw numbers, there will be more than two-times the number of job openings for software developers and programmers (494,000) as there are for lawyers (212,000) this decade. And in terms of percent growth, the number of new jobs for lawyers will grow more slowly than total employment (10% vs. 14.3%, respectively), while the number of computer jobs grows by 22 percent through 2020.

Which of the STEM jobs does the BLS see as growing the fastest this decade? The number of positions for biomedical engineers will rise from 15,700 to 25,400 by between 2010 and 2020, a jump of 62 percent. While not a huge raw number, the percent change is telling. For example, consider that the growth rate for chemical engineers will only be 6 percent during these same years. If I were a young student with a general interest in a STEM job, I know one career that I’d be looking into seriously. …

5. Teach and train the next generation.

There will be some 3.4 million education, training, and library job openings due to growth and replacement through 2020. This will be driven by a variety of trends including the maturing of the 80+ million Millennials, the largest living American generation. As more of the Millennials enter their 30s and start having children, it will drive the need for teachers and other education-related positions in the next decade and beyond. As a category, these jobs have a mean annual wage of $46,000. But remember, this means that half of the people with these jobs earn more than $46,000 and half earn less, and some positions in teacher-friendly states can lead to total compensation of salary and benefits close to $100,000.

6. Health-and-wellness jobs will boom.

Driven by trends such as the aging of the population and the increasing focus people are putting on health and wellness, there will be 3.6 million job openings for healthcare practitioners and technicians due to growth and replacement through 2020. These occupations include doctors and surgeons ($166K median salary), pharmacists ($112K median), physical therapists ($76K median), radiology techs ($54K), athletic trainers ($42K median), and even veterinarians ($82K median).

The clear standout opportunity in this area is for registered nurses, which should have the most job growth of all occupations through 2020, with a projected 712,000 new jobs. Between these new positions, and ones opening up due to replacement needs, there will be 1.2 million total job openings for RNs through 2020. And nursing is increasingly a job for both men and women. In 2011, men made up about 6 percent of all nurses, but it’s estimated that by 2020 they could make up 25 percent of all nurses in the United States.

There will also be some 2 million more jobs in healthcare support careers. These positions require lower levels of education than the practitioner and technician careers and include jobs like orderlies in hospitals and physical therapy assistants. Of these healthcare support careers, the fastest growing will be for home health aides. The number of home health aides will explode by some 70 percent over the next decade, leading to some 706,000 new jobs. This is evidence of the deep desire of Americans to “age in place” and remain independent and at home as long as possible.

What does all of this information mean for your future?

The analysis above is just a quick overview of some of the occupations that should yield solid opportunities for students, young professionals, and career-changers in coming years.

If you’re a parent, projections like this can help you as you guide your children to think about their education and their future. Let them explore, try lots of things, but seed your conversations with them with projections like these, and bring a dose of reality to the discussion by showing them which occupations will be abundant and which may be more difficult to break into.

If their passion is in a sector or occupation that isn’t expected to see rapid job growth in the next decade, that’s okay. Encourage them to pursue their goals, but with data like this they can do it from a more informed perspective. For example, a teen interested in healthcare who is strong in the sciences will benefit from knowing that there are going to be roughly 35 times as many job openings for registered nurses as for veterinarians through 2020.

Encourage them to be a vet if that’s what they really want, and armed with this kind of data they’ll know the kind of competition they’re up against, which can be a strong motivator and spur them on to achieve this goal.

What are other ways this information will be useful for yourself and your kids?

  • Look for occupations that are going to add a lot of jobs in terms of raw numbers. This ensures you’re focused on big targets.
  • Look for areas that have high growth-rates. Focusing in on these fast-growing industries and occupations can help future-proof your (or your children’s) career and keep it in step with the changing 21st century economy.
  • Triangulate. Look at the raw numbers and growth rates, but don’t forget the personal angle. If you’re thinking of a career change, where does your passion lie … and what do you enjoy doing? Use the data to help guide and explore, but don’t force yourself (or your kids) into a career just because there are a lot of jobs to be had.
  • Explore the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) yourself, and learn about job prospects, earnings, and what people actually do day-to-day in hundreds of careers. The 2014-15 edition was released in January 2014 and can be found at http://www.bls.gov/ooh.

Sources: C. Brett Lockard and Michael Wolf, “Occupational Employment Projections to 2020,” Monthly Labor Review, January 2012, www.bls.gov; Table 1.7, Employment Projections Program, US Department of Labor, US Bureau of Labor Statistics; Male Nursing Statistics; “An Economy that Works: Job Creation and America’s Future,” McKinsey & Co.


About Chris Carbone

Chris Carbone has worked in trend and foresight consulting for more than a decade, serving clients from Fortune 500 corporation and foreign and US government agencies. During this time he has researched and authored dozens of reports and scenarios on wide-ranging topics … from the future of leisure and play, to the future of urban mobility, to emerging consumer lifestyles in China.

He has been quoted in numerous publications including The Miami Herald, The Washington Post Express, and Fast Company, and appeared on “The CBS Early Show.” He currently oversees Innovaro’s two multi-client research projects—Global Lifestyles and Technology Foresight—and contributes to the firm’s custom engagements.

Carbone has an MBA from Johns Hopkins University with a concentration in marketing, and received his undergraduate degree in history from Gettysburg College. For more information, contact him by email.

The world I believed in, back in my most innocent, uninformed, childish mind—is real.”

– Martha Beck

A discovery is said to be an accident meeting a prepared mind.”

– Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life: it goes on.

– Robert Frost

We are all faced with a series of great opportunities brilliantly disguised as impossible situations.”

– Charles R. Swindoll

As your desire is, so is your will. As your will is, so is your deed. As your deed is, so is your destiny.”

– Brihadaranyaka Upanishad

The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.”

– Carl Rogers

If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. 
Now put foundations under them.”

– Henry David Thoreau

You don’t love someone because of their looks or their clothes or their car. You love them because they sing a song only your heart can understand.”

– L.J. Smith

I’ve come to confirm that one’s title, even that of president, says little about how well one’s life has been led. No matter how much you’ve done, or how successful you’ve been, there’s always more to do, to learn, and to achieve.”

– Barack Obama

Remember that it’s okay to ask for help when you’re stumped, because sometimes you really can’t be expected to handle everything alone.”

– Martha Beck

The only way to compel men to speak good of us is to do it.”

– Voltaire

It is to no purpose to turn away from the real nature of the affair because the honor of its elements excites repugnance.

– Carl von Clausewitz, On War

Happy are those who dream dreams and are ready to pay the price to make them come true.”

– Leon Joseph Suenens

The less effort, the faster and more powerful you will be.”

– Bruce Lee

Your own words are the bricks and mortar
of the dreams you want to realize.
The words you choose and their use establish the life you experience.”

– Sonia Croquette

Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.”

– T.S. Eliot

Speaking more than one language is no longer just an asset in today’s job market; it is a requirement.”

– Tom Adams, CEO, Rosetta Stone

Most people never pick up the phone and call. Most people never ask, and that’s what separates the people who do things from the people who just dream about them.”

– Steve Jobs

A lot of people have ideas, but few decide to do something about them now. Not next week. But today.”

– Nolan Bushnell, founder, Atari

That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche

The fixity of a habit is generally in direct proportion to its absurdity.”

– Marcel Proust

Are you willing to help other people succeed even when it’s not a requirement of your job to be of assistance?”

– Steven Schussler

Do one thing every day that scares you.”

– Eleanor Roosevelt

He who wants to tear down a house must be prepared to rebuild it.”

– African Proverb

Part of your destiny is to live in the zone of maximum satisfaction.”

– Martha Beck

When we speak we are afraid our words will not be heard or welcomed. But when we are silent, we are still afraid. So it is better to speak.”

– Audre Lorde

Nobody talks about entrepreneurship as survival, but that’s exactly what nurtures creative thinking.”

– Anita Roddick, founder, The Body Shop

I’m not afraid of storms,
for I’m learning to sail my ship.”

– Louisa May Alcott

What is the point of having free will if one cannot occasionally spit in the eye of destiny?”

– Jim Butcher, White Night

Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken-winged bird that cannot fly. Hold fast to dreams, for when dreams go, life is a barren field frozen with snow.”

– Langston Hughes

Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant.”

– Robert Louis Stevenson

Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?”

– Mary Oliver

Just don’t give up trying to do what you really want to do.
Where there is love and inspiration, I don’t think you can go wrong.”

– Ella Fitzgerald

Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.”

– Groucho Marx

A great secret of success is to go through life as a man who never gets used up.”

– Albert Schweitzer

We never know how high we are
 till we are called to rise;
 And then, if we are true to plan,
 Our statures touch the skies.”

– Emily Dickinson

You often meet your fate on the road you take to avoid it.”

– Goldie Hawn

Don’t sit down and wait for the opportunities to come. Get up and make them!”

– Madam C.J. Walker

By your stumbling the world is perfected.”

– Sri Aurobindo

When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace.”

– Jimi Hendrix

Do you believe it is important to give back some portion of your wealth to support charitable causes?”

– Steven Schussler

We need to learn to set our course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

– General Omar Bradley

Do not say, ‘why were the former days better than these,’ for it is not from wisdom that you ask this.”

– Ecclesiastes, 7:10

Find somebody to be successful for. Raise their hopes. Think of their needs.”

– Barack Obama

Whosoever knows how to fight well is not angry. Whosoever knows how to conquer enemies does not fight them.”

– Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.”

– William Shakespeare

Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people.”

– Eleanor Roosevelt

The important thing is not being afraid to take a chance. The greatest failure is to not try.”

– Debbi Fields, Mrs. Fields Cookies

That man is richest whose pleasures are the cheapest.”

– Henry David Thoreau

A diamond is a lump of coal that stuck with it.”

– Norwegian proverb

Books

Adam Goodheart Reminds Us of What Life Was Like In "1861"

Civil War expert Adam Goodheart is the author of “1861,” which brings history to life with a gripping and original account of how the Civil War began. Don’t miss our Q&A with the historian.

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Fine Art

How Ivan Schwartz Is Sculpting History

From the iconic statue of Lincoln with his horse standing outside Lincoln’s Cottage in DC, to Frederick Douglass outside the New York Historical Society, sculptor Ivan Schwartz captures history in bronze.

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Hiring

How I Came to Love History

Are you a history buff? Barbara Mitchell says her passion for the past started in college—and continues to help her in her work as an HR and hiring expert. How does she keep history relevant, and can you, too? Don’t miss her three tips.

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History

David Bruce Smith Launches Grateful American™ Series Website and Asks: "How are you a Grateful American?"

In what ways do you consider yourself to be a Grateful American? That’s the question David Bruce Smith is investigating in his new Foundation through The Grateful American™ Series. We asked 13 citizens for their ideas and inspiration. And we want to hear from you!

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Networking

The Power of Networking

If you don’t know what your next career should be, see which of these networking events might clarify your path: InkandescentNetworking.com.

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Nonprofits

Teachers Bring History to Life at Gilder Lehrman Institute

If you are a lover of primary sources, you’ll likely know the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. First Lady Laura Bush was the keynote at their 2014 gala, which also featured the students who have mastered the subject. How can they help your child learn to love history? Don’t miss our Q&A with exec director Lesley Herrmann.

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PR Rules

Appreciate the Tension Between Reporters and Publicists

Since the Colonial era, there has been tension between reporters and publicists, politicians, and business leaders. How do we deal with this built-in tension today?

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Public Speaking

22 Tips for Shining on TV

If being on TV is one of your goals—and it’s also your greatest fear—follow these tips from ArticulateRC founders Robin Miller and Hilary Blair to shine in front of the video camera.

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Andrew Carnegie

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Managing Editor
Kathleen McCarthy
Website developer
Max Kukoy
Staff Photographer
Anna Paige Gibbs
Video Editor
Dax Coley
Radio Producers
Michael Wilsker, Brandi Merritt
Editorial Interns 2014

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Inkandescent Radio

History Comes to Life at the Robert H. Smith Center for the Constitution

The Center for the Constitution was established by The Montpelier Foundation in 2002 with a goal of becoming the nation’s leading resource in high-quality constitutional education. How are the directors accomplishing that mission? Click here to download the podcast.

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Retirement

Retirement and Women: Why Are So Many Older Women Living in Poverty?

Saving for retirement is challenging—but studies show it’s actually tougher for women, who all too often find themselves living in poverty during retirement. Financial adviser Carmen Wu offers insights.

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Speakers Bureau

Government 2014—Meet Karen Hanrahan, US Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy and Human Rights

From Ambassador Richard Holbrooke to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Karen Hanrahan has worked for top government leaders.

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Inkandescent TV

Introducing "The Grateful American™ TV Show"

If you love history, this show will excite you. If you like history, these episodes will educate you. If you are lukewarm about the Founding Fathers—prepare to be impressed! “The Grateful American™ TV Show: Restoring enthusiasm in American history, for kids and adults.

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Truly Amazing Women™ Who Are Changing the World

Catherine Allgor Shares Insights About the Sensational Dolley Madison

In this edition of Truly Amazing Women, we feature two Inkandescent women: “America’s 1st First Lady,” Dolley Madison, and her biographer Catherine Allgor.

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Videography

From "Star Wars" to Verizon: Videographer Dax Coley

Even when he was a kid, Dax Coley had a camera in his hand. “In middle school, I took pictures of my classmates, and edited them into a movie with a soundtrack.” As a professional, he’s worked for the Newseum and Verizon, and he’s now the new editor of InkandescentTV.

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Wealth

Wealth Management Rules: 12 Tips to Help You Harness Your Financial Know-How

What do you need to do to prepare for retirement? Rita Cheng explains.

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Wine

Taste Thomas Jefferson's Wine on the Monticello Wine Trail

The wineries on the Monticello Wine Trail have all been inspired by Thomas Jefferson’s vision of winemaking. With this in mind, we invite you to discover the Birthplace of American Wine.

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Andrew Carnegie

To learn more about becoming a client of Inkandescent Public Relations, or becoming a Be Inkandescent Magazine columnist. send an email to publisher and founder Hope Katz Gibbs at hope@inkandescentpr.com.

Here’s to your incredible, indelible, Inkandescent success!