• FALL 2016

The Business of Living the Life of Your Dreams

“What would you do if you knew you could not fail?” That’s the fridge door quote that sits on my Kenmore next to Eleanor Roosevelt’s famous suggestion, “Do one thing every day that scares you.”

I find that these daily reminders to be brave are essential to staying buoyant and focused as an entrepreneur. After all, when dealing with the uncertainty of business, it’s not always easy to keep small-business dreams alive.

That’s why this month we are excited to feature entrepreneurs Chris Smith and Scott Doherty, the creators and producers of Rockin’ Road to Dublin. The hit Irish dance and rock show embarked on a 60-city tour on Sept. 22, which is taking them around the country.

In this issue of Be Inkandescent magazine, you’ll learn how they are making their dream of bringing the new generation of Irish dance to audiences nationwide. You’ll meet some of the 34 members of the cast and crew — including Broadway director Jeff Whiting and three-time world Irish dance champion Ashley Smith.

What’s it like to be in a bus traveling the country from show to show? You’ll get an inside glimpse thanks to Irish dancer and cast member Billy Kanaly. He is also a professional videographer, and on the tour he is creating a weekly webTV series that takes us behind the scenes. Click here to watch.

Are you living your dream? If not, take a tip from entertainer and entrepreneur extraordinaire Walt Disney, who said: “All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them.”

Here’s to embracing your courage! — Hope Katz Gibbs, publisher, Be Inkandescent magazine • Inkandescent PR

Are You Ready to Take on the Rockin' Road to Dublin?

On Thursday, Sept. 22, the new generation of Irish rock and dance began when ROCKINROAD TO DUBLIN inaugurated its 60-city national tour with a performance at the McGregor Hall Performing Arts Center in Henderson, NC. The entrepreneurs and co-creators who brought the show to life are Celtic rocker CHRIS SMITH and Irish Dance World Champion SCOTT DOHERTY.

“We bring a wee bit of Dublin with a rockin’ edge to the stage,” explains Smith, who has gathered an elite class of musicians to perform in the ROCKINROAD TO DUBLIN band:

  • JOHN BALDWIN (bass player, The American Rogues),
  • KEVEN EKNES (an award-winning guitarist from Norway),
  • MARITA MAY (classically trained on violin since age 5; Celtic Fyre),
  • KELLY MILLS (five-time winner of the Drum Corps and Percussion World Championships),
  • MIKE MOORE (Busch Gardens and Kings Dominion),
  • JOE SCHERMANN (“Guys and Dolls,” “White Christmas,” “Grease,” “Smokey Joe’s Café,” and “Shout”),
  • COREY WALDEN (The American Rogues, and founder of The Suzuki School of Milford).

“It’s truly the music that gets the audience on their feet,” insists Doherty (“Riverdance” and “Lord of the Dance”), who has worked his own magic choreographing the critically acclaimed show. The 2009 Men’s World Champion of Irish Dance, Doherty made his professional debut in 2005 with the North American tour of Michael Flatley’s “Riverdance,” and also has toured the world with “Lord of the Dance.”

The show’s star power continues with ROCKINROAD TO DUBLIN’s two lead vocalistsMEGAN LYNN BROWNING (Harley Boone) and BRETT BENOWITZ (Born Blue).

“The lyrics of the songs tell a love story that weaves together the music and dance,” explains the show’s director, Broadway choreographer JEFF WHITING (“The Producers,” and “Bullets Over Broadway”). “Our goal is to have the audience walk away having had an experience that is entertaining, uplifting, and inspirational.”

Music supervision, arrangements, and orchestrations are by BRENT FREDERICK; original costume design is by SARAH COFFEY and ASHLEY WILSON; lighting is by CAROLYN WONG; scenic design is by BRIAN BARKER; and sound consultation is by TREY SMITH.

Of course, ROCKINROAD TO DUBLIN wouldn’t be the show it is without the Irish dancing. For the cast, choreographer Doherty chose three-time international Irish dance champion ASHLEY SMITH to be his lead female dancer. On stage since the age of 3, at 16, Smith (no relation to Chris) was crowned the World Irish Step Dancing Champion in Belfast in 2004 — making her the youngest American female ever to win the world title at that time. A top-30 female finalist on the hit TV show “So You Think You Can Dance,” Smith was a featured dancer on the Oscar-nominated film “Silver Linings Playbook.”

Rounding out the cast are other well-known Irish dancers:

  • COLIN BARKELL has earned three regional titles, a fourth-place finish at the North American Championships, and an eighth-place finish at the World Championships. He has been the lead dancer in Rhythm of the Dance and Celtic Fyre and is also a member of the Hammerstep Dance Crew.
  • MARK CHICHESTER won the All England Tap Championship, All England National Championship, and was crowned UK’s Young Tap Dancer of the Year. He went on to join the cast of “Excalibur: The Celtic Rock Opera,” “Gaelforce Dance,” “Dance Masters,” “Celtic Dream,” and “Rhythm of the Dance,” as well as Michael Flatley’s “Lord of the Dance.”
  • DECLAN CROWLEY is an eight-time Mid-Atlantic, two-time National, and All-Ireland champion. He also won the coveted Minor Belt National Championship in 2005, and has placed within the top three in the world times over. Crowley’s filmography credits include “Feet of Flames RAW” (2010), “Irish Celtic Generations — Live in Paris” (2016), and “West Side Story: Mashup” (HBO, 2012).
  • BERNADETTE DEVEREAUX has won multiple titles during her competitive career, including winning first place at her Regional Championships five times, placing in the top five at the National Championships, and placing at the World Championships. She toured with Michael Flatley’s “Lord of the Dance” and achieved her dream of dancing the lead, performing alongside Flatley.
  • MEGAN KIRK DRAKE first began touring with Celtic Legends and has since performed with Atlantic Steps, A Gaelic Gathering, Raglan Road at Disney World, and in “Rhythm of the Dance,” where she performed as principal female dancer. She has competed at the World Championship level and placed in the top five in the Western US Region multiple times.
  • PATRICK HOLLAND, a two-time Mid-American champion, has placed as high as fourth in the North American Championships, and 10th in the World Championships. Holland has performed with various productions, including Cherish the Ladies, Michael Londra’s Celtic Fire, and The Chieftains.
  • BILLY KANALY has been a professional Irish dancer for eight years, performing around the world, including four years as a cast member of “Riverdance.”
  • EMILY MACCONNELL has achieved competitive career highs of eighth in the world, third nationally, and first in her own and Southern England regions. She has danced and toured both nationally and internationally with “Magic of the Dance,” and “An Irish Christmas.”
  • ERIKA NIELSEN has competitively achieved Southern Region Oireachtas Champion three times, top five at the North American Nationals, and medaled at the All Ireland and World Championships. She also performed in Michael Flatley’s “Lord of the Dance: Dangerous Games.”
  • TYLER SCHWARTZ has won many dance titles, including the Midwest Regional Championship, the All-Ireland Championship, All-Scotland Championship, North American Championship, and Great-Britain Championship, and he won the Senior Men’s World Championship in 2013. He has been principal lead dancer for the Magic of the Dance, and “Gaelforce Dance.”
  • CIARA STILLSON has performed with renowned Irish music acts, including Solas, Eileen Ivers, and Cherish the Ladies. For three years she danced in Celtic Fyre at Busch Gardens and recently graduated magna cum laude from Gorham High School.
  • MAIRÉAD STILLSON has spent the last seven years as a principal dancer and dance captain of Busch Gardens’ Celtic Fyre. She recently performed the lead role of Morrighan in Michael Flatley’s “Lord of the Dance: Dangerous Games.”

Learn more about the musicians and creative team here. Click here to see when the show is coming to your city. Be sure to read our Q&A with the creators and producers of the show, Scott Doherty and Chris Smith.

How to Silence a Silent Killer

Making more people aware of the silent, deadly disease of ovarian cancer is the mission for Rachel and Bob Gendelman — the daughter and husband of Sherri Gendelman, who died Nov. 22, 2014, after a 17-month battle with the cancer that annually kills about 14,000 women.

On July 30, 2016, more than 400 people came out to support the 2nd Annual Sherri’s Walk by the Water, an event designed to raise funds that will help put an end to a disease that the American Cancer Society calls a silent killer.

“Our goal was to raise as much money as possible for ovarian cancer research initiatives,” explains Sherri’s daughter, Rachel Gendelman, who with her father, Bob, created the Sherri S. Gendelman Fund and organized Sherri’s Walk by the Water, which was hosted by the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition this year.

Starting at 8 AM at Margate, New Jersey’s famous Lucy the Elephant national historic landmark, a sea of sweaty but determined supporters took a two-mile walk down the beach to the pier that Sherri and her family strolled to for decades. By 10 AM, they raised $79,149.

Scroll down for our interview with the friends and family members who are keeping Sherri’s memory alive through this annual event.


Be Inkandescent: Barbara, you and I were childhood friends, and I am so impressed with the work you have done creating your own remarkably successful video firm based in Philadelphia, BTK Communications Group. I am so sorry to hear of the loss of your dear friend Sherri. Take us back to the beginning of this organization. How did it come to fruition?

Barbara Tarlow Radler: Bob and Rachel told me they had an idea to start a fund to raise money for clinical trials at Abington hospital — and help provide access to patients who couldn’t afford care.

Be Inkandescent: You must have been devastated by your loss. It’s so awful when our parents and grandparents pass, but to have a friend die must have been a blow beyond belief. Some of our readers may have struggled with similar grief.

Barbara Tarlow Radler: It’s definitely a process. And a year and a half later, I still can’t believe this happened. Sherri was my healthy friend who went to the gym every day. She was the best listener, never judged, and always made me feel like family. I remember going out for lunch with Bob several months after Sherri passed. I was thinking I should be cheering him up, and he said, “Man, you’re depressing.” He actually gave me his grief counseling papers and made me read up on them … and made me take the thousand pictures I had of her in my office and downsize to my two favorites … one day at a time. Now when I get my signals from her, I smile and think of the memories we shared. Yes, I still have my rough moments — and this is one of them … but I get a warm feeling in my heart, instead of that sick empty feeling every time I think of her.

Be Inkandescent: What I think is truly a testimony to Sherri is how you all banded together, gathered your personal strengths, and curated this event. Was the first one tough to create?

Barbara Tarlow Radler: Actually, for the first event, we were on a mission We had no idea what we were doing — we just jumped in. I knew I could produce a video to tell our story, but it was really Rachel, Bob, and Sue with the vision of the event, and how to fundraise. I just tried to help where I could.

Be Inkandescent: So how did the second event, on July 30, 2016, come to fruition?

Barbara Tarlow Radler: The second event was trickier. We all knew how hard the first event was, and we were all starting to heal a little bit, and the thought of doing it again felt very overwhelming … but I called Rachel and said, “Look, I understand if it’s too much — it feels overwhelming to me and your dad, Sue, and our friend Lori … we all were worried it would be too much — but whatever you decide, I am here to support you. And Rachel said, “I know it will be hard, but I want to do this.” And here we are.

Be Inkandescent: That brings us to you, Rachel. You are clearly a powerhouse when it comes to making things happen. Tell us a little about yourself — what you do for a living — and what you learned from your mom.

Rachel Gendelman: I currently live in Center City, Philadelphia, and I work for a healthcare company in sales covering the Southern New Jersey area. In my free time, aside from our mission on curing ovarian cancer, I enjoy volunteering with animals and spending time with friends and family. I learned so many things from my mom, and the older I get the more I start to see her ways in me — from being able to find the best deals when shopping, to my love for animals and music, to being extremely compassionate toward everyone I come in contact with.

She said to me the day before she was moved to hospice that you never know how strong you can be until faced with a challenge. Whether it was cancer, work challenges, or personal challenges, she reminded me that no matter how difficult something is, you are able to face it and deal with it. When she said this, she was talking about her 17-month battle with ovarian cancer, because she tried everything she possibly could to stay with us, and faced her fears and the unknown. Although it was not the outcome we wanted, she was able to get through the daily challenges she was faced with in those 17 months.

Be Inkandescent: Every mother who reads this knows that your mom is insanely proud of you. Does this event keep you closer to her? I can’t imagine how difficult it must be to move on from this loss. How are you doing?

Rachel Gendelman: It does. This event for me is about keeping my mom’s memory alive and at the same time helping thousands of patients, whether it’s in research, clinical trials, or patient assistance. I remember my mom telling me to keep her Facebook active and make sure that no one forgets about her. This is the best way for us to honor her memory and to shed light on a disease that most are not familiar with.

We are not only able to save patients through the funds we raise, but also by shedding that light on awareness/symptoms. Even though challenging, this event does make us feel good about helping people while keeping her name out there. Each day is still a bit like a roller coaster. Though it has almost been two years, we still take it day by day. It’s still very hard to believe and accept, but we keep moving forward and try to enjoy life the way she would want us to.

Be Inkandescent: Tell us more about the second annual walk. What are your hopes and goals from this year’s event?

Rachel Gendelman: Our first year doing the walk was such a success that we really wanted to be able to build on last year, meaning a reach of new people, raffles, a DJ, massages, two silent auctions, more participants, and the ability to raise more money!

The Sherri S. Gendelman Fund teamed up with the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition this year, and we were able to make all of those things happen already! I hope that those who attended the event really took away the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer. It is a disease that has a 90 percent, five-year survival rate when caught at an earlier stage. Last year alone, we were successful at explaining our mission and awareness, and we were able to help three people go to their doctors who were diagnosed with very early stages of ovarian cancer. One is now cancer free!

Be Inkandescent: Do you hope to host a third event next year? If so, what are your goals and expectations for that one?

Rachel Gendelman: I do. Each year I think emotionally it gets harder. This past year compared to our first year was very difficult for all of us. It starts to make you realize how long it’s been since my mom passed away and how long it has been since I have seen her or had a conversation with her, especially because I used to talk to her multiple times a day, every single day. But the event has been so successful that we are all excited to plan for our 3rd Annual Sherri’s Walk by the Water. My mom deserves to have this event, and those diagnosed with this disease deserve to have the treatment they need and advanced research towards finding a cure.

The expectation, in a sense, still says the same — continuing to build on what has been successful: the ability to reach more people, raise more money, and save lives while keeping my mom’s name out there. It has been amazing to see the ongoing support from friends, family, and even participants we did not know. We also had five ovarian cancer survivors attend the walk, which made it even more special.

Be Inkandescent: Let’s loop in your dad, Bob Gendelman. Bob, from your entrepreneurial perspective, what have you learned? And what would you have done differently knowing what you now know about creating a cancer fund, and hosting events like this one?

Bob Gendelman: Honestly, I would have stayed calmer through every step of the planning phase. As you can imagine, the year following Sherri’s death was very emotional for all of us. Tempers ran high, my internal micromanager took over, and I don’t think I was always on my best behavior. After doing this event two years in a row now, and seeing how successful we were in attracting people to participate and raising funds, I know that everything will be fine. That’s true for any event, and for life in general. I learned again not to sweat the small stuff.

Be Inkandescent: And I have to say to you, of course, how sorry I am for your loss. How are you coping? Does this walk help?

Bob Gendelman: It’s two years later and I sometimes wake up in the morning and I can’t believe this has happened. I try to keep myself busy and be there for Rachel the best I can. I try to be both the best dad and mom I can be for her, but knowing how close Sherri and Rachel were, that’s tough. So this Walk by the Water event for me is mixed; it definitely stirs up emotions that I’m trying to deal with.

But I’ll tell you, the high point was on what would have been Sherri’s 60th birthday, which was a really hard day — and, it was the day the fundraising for the Walk passed the $60,000 mark. I know everyone involved in the planning of this had the chills when that happened. What truly touches us is the outpouring of support. Sherri was worried people would forget, so when hundreds of people signed up and supported our cause in Sherri’s name, it does lift us up.

Be Inkandescent: Now let’s turn the discussion to Sue Epstein, who was a good friend of Sherri’s and took the lead on getting sponsors, as she had the most fundraising experience in the group — and also had the most friends in common with Sherri between their high school class, Zumba, and the Jersey Shore. What kinds of things are important when fundraising?

Sue Epstein: I always feel when people give to fundraising that people give to people, I think sometimes even more than to a cause — although it helps knowing that it’s good cause. Knowing the person who this is in memory or honor of makes it easier, too. The people I reached out to knew this was personal to me, and they knew Sherri and that helped. When they turn you down, just keep a smile on your face and don’t accept “no” for an answer — and eventually they will support your cause.

Be Inkandescent: What happened when you started reaching out to people to be sponsors for the first Walk by the Water? What was your strategy and what did you learn?

Sue Epstein: I knew I would do anything for Rachel, so of course I volunteered to be on the core planning team with Bob and Barbara. And I thought I would just do what I do and reach out to everyone I know. I also know that can be challenging because everyone has their own causes, and it can be awkward to ask people for money. But with all of my years working on fundraisers, I never had such an easy time raising money and finding sponsors. I think it was because to know Sherri was to love Sherri, and people just wanted to be a part of it and support our cause in her name.

Be Inkandescent: What was the second year like for you? Was it harder? What advice would you have for other people trying to start a fund or hold an event?

Sue Epstein: Yes, it was harder the second year. In my opinion the first year is the easiest because you strike when the iron is hot. Especially when it’s in memory of someone who passes, everyone is mourning and remembering and they jump to give. The second year, people may not be as apt to give as much as they did initially because they have gotten busy with their lives. So you have to be persistent, and eventually they will get back on board. But it’s definitely harder as time goes on.

It’s also important that they believe in the cause — and knowing that ovarian cancer can touch so many women and their families means so much to so many. And in this case, I think it helped that a nice portion of the money stayed local … our local people loved that.

Be Inkandescent: Vanda Soldati, let’s turn to you. You are the Delaware Valley chapter manager from the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition who worked on the 2016 walk with Sherri’s team. Tell us about the statistics.

Vanda Soldati: The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2015, more than 21,000 women in the United States received a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, and at least 14,000 U.S. women died from it. In fact, ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women, accounting for more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. A woman’s risk of getting ovarian cancer during her lifetime is about 1 in 75. Her lifetime chance of dying from ovarian cancer is about 1 in 100.

Be Inkandescent: From your perspective, why is ovarian cancer still such a problem for so many women?

Vanda Soldati: It’s because the symptoms are nonspecific, and there is a lack of early-detection tests. Women need to look for things like bloating, urinating frequently, getting full quickly, and abdominal or lower back pain, which are symptoms that all women experience at one time or another. Therefore, only about 20 percent of cases are diagnosed early. The key here is to pay attention if these symptoms persist for more two weeks. Since early detection is critical to survival rates, this is the challenge. So knowing this, and alerting your doctor if you experience these symptoms, is essential.

Be Inkandescent: In addition to fundraising and awareness events like Sherri’s Walk by the Water, what is being done to cure this disease?

Vanda Soldati: Remember, the five-year survival rate is high when the cancer is found in its early stages, which is why funding is needed to find early diagnostic tools. The National Ovarian Cancer Coalition is proud to support Sherri’s Walk by the Water because money raised will be going directly to NOCC research initiatives in conjunction with Stand Up to Cancer research initiatives. We are excited because a portion of the money will be going to the Sherri S. Gendelman Fund for Ovarian Cancer Research at Abington Hospital-Jefferson Health, which is local to our NOCC chapter.

In fact, Stand Up to Cancer team leader Dr. Alan D’Andrea says, “We now see defective DNA repair as a more general vulnerability of ovarian cancer. We hope to extend the use of PARP inhibitors to many other patients and find combinations with other drugs that will be effective against ovarian cancer.”

Be Inkandescent: What do you want all of our readers, listeners, and viewers to do to help spread the word?

Vanda Soldati: I’d ask everyone to go to our website, Ovarian.org, where they can see our upcoming events and contribute to and join the fight against ovarian cancer.

For more information about the Sherri S. Gendelman Fund, visit SSGfund.org.

Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow know what you truly want to become.”

– Steve Jobs

Find somebody to be successful for. Raise their hopes. Think of their needs.”

– Barack Obama

You don’t go into a field that requires cracking people’s heads open or operating on something as delicate as the spinal cord unless you are comfortable with taking risks.”

– Dr. Ben Carson

The gem cannot be polished without friction; nor man perfected without trials.”

– Chinese proverb

Successful people are always looking for opportunities to help others. Unsuccessful people are always asking, ‘What’s in it for me?’”

– Brian Tracy

Treat the attainment of happiness in the same way an entrepreneur would approach building a business — with a vision, plan, goals, and a systematic approach.”

– Ted Leonsis

History is a relentless master. It has no present, only the past rushing into the future. To try to hold fast is to be swept aside.”

– John F. Kennedy

Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are. 
Let me not pass you by in quest of some rare and perfect tomorrow.”

– Mary Jean Irion

Destiny is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved.”

– William Jennings Bryan

But all the while I was alone, the past was close behind, I seen a lot of women, but she never escaped my mind, and I just grew, tangled up in blue.”

– Bob Dylan

There are risks and costs to a program of action. But they are far less than the long-range risks and costs of comfortable inaction.”

– JFK

Be bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.”

– Basil King

We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us.”

– Joseph Campbell

Let yourself be silently drawn by the strange pull of what you really love.”

– Jalaluddin Rumi

When you are asked if you can do a job, tell ‘em, ‘Certainly I can!’ Then get busy and find out how to do it.”

– Theodore Roosevelt

An entrepreneur tends to bite off a little more than he can chew hoping he’ll quickly learn how to chew it.“


– Roy Ash, co-founder of Litton Industries

As your desire is, so is your will. As your will is, so is your deed. As your deed is, so is your destiny.”

– Brihadaranyaka Upanishad

Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.”

– Thomas Edison

What is the point of having free will if one cannot occasionally spit in the eye of destiny?”

– Jim Butcher, White Night

The young man knows the rules, but the old man knows the exceptions.”

– Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., U.S. Supreme Court justice

Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.”

– William Butler Yeats

You don’t love someone because of their looks or their clothes or their car. You love them because they sing a song only your heart can understand.”

– L.J. Smith

Traveling is one way of lengthening life, at least in appearance.”

– Benjamin Franklin

Ripeness is all.”

– William Shakespeare

Do not say, ‘why were the former days better than these,’ for it is not from wisdom that you ask this.”

– Ecclesiastes, 7:10

The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.”

– Carl Rogers

If my mind can conceive it, and my heart can believe it, I know I can achieve it.”

– Jesse Jackson

Whosoever knows how to fight well is not angry. Whosoever knows how to conquer enemies does not fight them.”

– Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

Acknowledging the good that you already have in your life is the foundation for all abundance.”

– Eckhart Tolle

Let us seize the day and the opportunity and strive for that greatness of spirit that measures life not by its disappointments but by its possibilities.”

– W.E.B. Du Bois

You’ve got to be willing to crash and burn. If you’re afraid of failing, you won’t get very far.”

– Steve Jobs

I always maintained that the greatest obstacle in life isn’t danger, it’s boredom. The battle against it is responsible for most of the events in the world — good or ill.”

– Dr. Evelyn Vogel, Dexter

The man who acquires the ability to take full possession of his own mind may take possession of anything else to which he is justly entitled.”

– Andrew Carnegie

You only live once. But if you do it right, once is enough.”

– Mae West

We are not meant to resolve all contradictions, but to live with them and rise above them.”

– William Blake

The quality of your life is directly related to the amount of uncertainty you can comfortably live with.”

– Tony Robbins

The true entrepreneur is a doer, not a dreamer.”

– Nolan Bushnell, founder, Chuck E. Cheese's

Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people.”

– Eleanor Roosevelt

Sometimes the dreams that come true are the dreams you never even knew you had.”

– Alice Sebold, The Lovely Bones

The dove descending breaks the air / With flame of inkandescent terror.”

– T.S. Eliott

The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.”

– Carl Rogers

We need to learn to set our course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

– General Omar Bradley

As each woman realizes her power, she transforms the world.”

– Patrice Wynne, WomanSpirit Sourcebook

That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche

The only way to compel men to speak good of us is to do it.”

– Voltaire

Friendship is the only cement that will hold the world together.”

– Woodrow Wilson

To find what you seek in the road of life, leave no stone unturned.”

– Edward Bulwer Lytton

There’s nowhere you can be that isn’t where you’re meant to be…”

– John Lennon

We are perfectionists. We are hungry to work all the time. We are entertained by every aspect of business and we never want to stop working.”

– Suzy Welch

Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional.”

– Dalai Lama

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